Standard Benefits for Full-Time Nannies

Paid Vacation
Paid Holidays
Paid Sick Days
Paid Inclement Weather Days
Guaranteed Hours
Household Account
Mileage
Business Use Rider

Paid Vacation
2 weeks paid vacation is standard within the industry with one week at the nanny’s discretion and one week at the employer’s discretion.  Obviously the less restrictions you place on your nanny’s vacation time, the more attractive the benefit is. If you do have specific parameters, be sure to discuss them during the interview process and clearly outline them in the nanny contract.

Paid Holidays
It’s standard within the industry to provide major holidays as paid days off when that holiday falls on a normal work day. Major holidays include New Year’s Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving, and Christmas. Although it’s not standard many nannies ask that if the holiday falls on a Saturday or Sunday, they receive the Monday after the holiday off as a paid day off.

If employers are off work for additional holidays, they often pass that benefit along to their nanny and give her the day off too. These holidays can include Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Birthday, Washington’s Birthday, Columbus Day, Veteran’s Day, the Friday after Thanksgiving, Christmas Eve, and New Year’s Eve.

Paid Sick Days
2 to 5 paid sick days per employment year are standard within the industry. It’s important for employers to have a back-up childcare plan in place so they’re not left scrambling if their nanny gets sick.

It’s important to note that a sick day is defined as the nanny calling in sick. If an employer asks the nanny to say home because she has symptoms of a possible illness (e.g. stuffy nose, fever), that falls under guaranteed hours.

Paid Inclement Weather Days
If you live in an area that typical gets harsh winter weather, 1 to 3 paid inclement weather days per year.

Additional Reading
What Is Your Snow Day Policy?

Guaranteed Hours
Guaranteed hours are a standard benefit in the industry. This means that if the family chooses not use the nanny during her regularly scheduled hours (e.g. Mom comes home early, the family goes on vacation), the nanny is still paid for those hours. If the nanny decides to take time off (e.g. take off early to attend a concert, takes off Friday for a long weekend) and doesn’t have paid time off available, the family isn’t required to pay her for those hours.

Additional Reading
Holidays and Guaranteed Hours

Household Account
It’s the employers’ responsibility to pay for all expenses the nanny incurs while providing childcare or household support. This might include craft supplies, admission to and lunch at the zoo for the nanny and child, or a quick grocery shop.

Additional Reading

Mileage
In most states, a nanny is legally entitled to the IRS mileage reimbursement rate for every mile she drives on the job when using her own car. It’s a standard benefit in nationwide.  This reimbursement covers the full cost of operating the car including gas, regular maintenance, and repairs. The rate increased to 54.5 cents per mile beginning January 1st, 2018.  Outside of a legal requirement, it’s a standard benefit in the industry.

Business Use Rider
If a nanny uses her own car for work, state law may require her to carry a business use rider that provides coverage during work hours. It’s standard for the employer to pay the cost of the business use rider. This is normally pretty inexpensive; usually around $10 to $15 a month.